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The festival which best epitomizes Vietnam’s cultural identity is Vietnamese New Year or Tet. For the Vietnamese people, Vietnamese New Year is like a combination of Western Saint Sylvester, New Year’s Day, Christmas, Easter and Thanksgiving. It is the festival of Purity and Renewal. Following are the most typical food found in Vietnamese’ Tet holiday.

5. Mut – Candied Fruits

 

 Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year

 

Mut Tet (Tet jam) is like a snack to welcome guests in this special period. Mut is always kept in beautiful boxes and placed at the table in the living room, and it is the main food for the owners and guests to taste when they’re talking, enjoyed over a cup of tea.

Unlike Western jam, which is usually in liquid form and served with bread, “Vietnamese jam” is mainly in dry form, usually dried fruits and some kind of seeds (pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, watermelon seeds). This once-in-year mix of snack is very large in variety, with so many tastes: ginger, carrot, coconut, pineapple, pumpkin, lotus seed, star fruit, sweet potato. Nowadays, cake and sweet are slowly replacing jam in Tet period, but many people still love the taste this unique food – an angle of Vietnamese culture.

4. Boiled Chicken – Thit Ga

Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year

 

 

Living in a culture of wet rice civilization, Vietnamese has a deep connection with nature and to them, besides the buffalo, chicken is one of the six most familiar animals (including: chicken, pig, goat, buffalo, and horse).

Chicken meat in Tet meals are various in forms: usually chicken are boiled and sliced, but sometimes people can place the whole chicken in a plate. Chicken meat is served with Xoi (sticky rice) and Banh Chung, and become one of the most popular main dishes in Tet holidays. Boiled chicken are always go with sliced lemon leaves and salt-and-pepper sauce, as a tradition.

3. Sticky Rice – Xoi

 

 

Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year

It will be a big miss if you come to Vietnam without trying “xoi”. Make from sticky rice, xoi has as many variants as you can imagine. Xoi (Sticky rice) is also a very important part of Tet holiday in Vietnam, since the meals to worship the ancestors can not missing this dish. Moreover, along with Banh Chung, xoi is the main staple foods for Tet holiday. Xoi in Tet holidays can be seen in many forms: Xoi Lac (sticky rice with peanuts), Xoi Do Xanh (sticky rice with mung bean), Xoi Gac (sticky rice with special “gac” fruit). Among these types, xoi gac is favorite the most by people because of its special red color – symbolizes the luck and new achievement for the New Year. Xoi is usually served with Gio Cha or boiled chicken in Tet meals.

2. Vietnamese Sausage

Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year

 

 

Gio Cha (Vietnamese ham/sausage) is another traditional food in Tet holiday, and usually served with Xoi (sticky rice) and Banh Chung. Vietnamese people make Gio from lean meat, added fish sauce and covered by leaves then boiled for hours. Cha is also made of lean pork and ingredients, but Cha is not wrapped by leaves and boiled but deep-fried in oil. All these types are used not only in Tet holidays but also over the year.

1. Banh Chung – Square Cake

 

 

Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year Traditional Foods in Vietnam on Lunar New Year

Banh Chung is a must among other foods to be placed on the ancestors’ altars during Tet holiday. Banh Chung is a food made from glutinous rice, mung bean and pork, added with many other ingredients. Banh Chung is covered by green leaves (usually banana leaves) and symbolizes the Earth, invented by the prince Lang Lieu from Hung King dynasty.

In the old time, one or two days before Tet, every family prepares and cooks the Banh Chung around the warm fire. It is also the time for parents to tell their children folklore stories. Nowadays, families which live in villages still maitain making Banh Chung before New Years but the people in the city does not. They don’t have time and prefer to go to the shop to buy it.

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